Friday, July 13, 2012

Your Ticket to Freedom From Mortgage Frustration


Your Ticket to Freedom from Mortgage Frustration
In the news, there is talk of a housing recovery. Experts feel more optimistic about the state of housing industry in America. However, if you or someone you know is one of the millions of homeowners who is stuck with a home on which you owe more than the property is worth, the feeling of helplessness can be overwhelming and frustrating.

Many people don’t realize that just because they are in danger of losing their home to foreclosure doesn’t mean they have to wait around for it to happen. With help, they can take matters into their own hands.

CLAIM YOUR TICKET TO FREEDOM!

As a Certified Distressed Property Expert (CDPE), I make it my business to know all of the ins-and-outs of the options that are available for people who are in danger of losing their homes and help the challenges head-on.

Contact me today to schedule a free, confidential consultation.

Talk To Jere!
334-324-9485

Monday, July 2, 2012

The Star Spangled Banner

Our American flag is obviously the symbol of our country but it has come to remind us of every man and woman who has fought for the freedom that we enjoy. The emotions that are stirred by images of our flag can run from happiness to sadness to even anger and everything in between.

Most of us learned basic flag etiquette when we were young but occasionally, it is a good idea to review the procedures so that we treat the flag with the respect that it deserves.

  • The U.S. flag should not be flown at night unless a light is shown on it.
  • The flag should never touch the ground.
  • The U.S. flag should not be flown upside down except as a distress signal.
  • A U.S. flag should be displayed at the peak of the staff unless the flag is at half-staff.
  • When displaying multiple flags of a state, community or society on the same flagpole, the U.S. flag must always be on top.
  • When flown with flags of states, communities or societies on separate flag poles which are of the same height and in a straight line, the flag of the United States is always placed in the position of honor - to its own right. No flag should be higher or larger that the U.S. flag. The U.S. flag is always the first flag raised and the last to be lowered.
  • When the U.S. flag is flown with those of other countries, each flag should be the same size and must be on separate poles of the same height. Ideally, the flags should be raised and lowered simultaneously.